What books alone can’t teach you about food and sustainability

By Jason Minos from Northern Arizona University

I have been at Northern Arizona University’s Sustainable Communities graduate program for the last year, with a focus on food systems.  The study abroad program to Siena with the focus on food and sustainability came to my attention early in my professional student career.  I did not think much of it at first…but soon realized this might be a program worth looking into.  So, I starting asking around about the program and found some students who attended last year.  I got some feedback and then contacted Gioia Woods who was leading the program. We sat down and corresponded by e-mail in order to make sure this is what I wanted.  Gioia explained to me in detail what we would be exploring in Siena, the history of food, sustainable practices, local cuisine and practices, wine (my eyes widened) and so forth.  I thought I would be dumb not to go!  Experience Italy? Its food, culture and people?  This was something I could not fully experience on a vacation alone, so I signed up.

This course has given me an intense look into the history of food.  The history from the Etruscans through the 20th century helped me understand how environmental values have shaped how we eat, what we eat, and even economic systems.  I have always thought that history needs to be put in front of us, not behind us, so we can see it clearly.  I realized if we are to change our food systems globally we need to look at these histories otherwise, (as many wise people have said) we will end up repeating it.

During this program we examined such themes as social issues and symbolism that food can have.  For example, we went to Florence to the Galleria degli Uffizi.  Of course, the Uffizi is a famous museum with a stunning collection from famous painters such as Michelangelo.  I really enjoyed the Dutch painters of the 1500-1700s. In their detail they seemed to portray enjoyable times and food, which portrayed daily concerns and social class.  One painting I enjoyed was Jan Steen’s Luncheon- 1650-1660.  What drew me to it was one female, her back to the viewer. Her possible expressions were not portrayed or expressed.  All that is visible is the back of her head.  What did she think about the simple food at table? Another thing that drew me to this painting is the attention to detail.  The paintings are almost life like.  To me it looks as though the pauper violinist is playing happily to the crowd.  However, I am not sure if he is playing just to entertain or to perhaps earn some food.  It appears that the setting is in a tavern of the era and they are enjoying their time.  There is a relaxed feeling here even though maybe these people are of different social classes, and it is food that brings them together. The man sitting on the bench looks like an artist.  Although there are different types of people represented in the painting, there does not seem to be a huge class difference.  The women, who has her back turned, does not seem to be serving the men, although the knife is right in front of her slightly hanging off the table edge in her direction, to use.  The food in the picture is ham, bread and wine.  I feel it represents a celebratory meal that is done later in the day after work.  I would say that they do this kind of thing quite often.

 

Some of the most enjoyable adventures I had in Siena were a trip to Spannochia, an organic and sustainable farm up in the mountains near Siena.  This was an amazing place where they raise heritage Sienese pigs as well as other products.  The practices they use are a model that I would like to study more and I am appreciative of this experience.  The field trip ended with a great adventure, missing our bus where we had to hike back down to the city below, in pouring rain, on the side of the road (there were no sidewalks or a bike lane, about three inches of road to walk on or jumping off into the weeds).  Some people may not have enjoyed this but it was an amazing walk where I experienced much more than I would have cruising by in a bus.  The other trip I enjoyed was the Bottega di Stigliano, where Andrea, the coordinator of the bottega, gave us such important information about the issues of food in Italy and again the fight against the global forces.  This trip although short was not short on important information.

I can say through this experience I have seen things that have opened my eyes about food systems not just in Italy but in the U.S. and globally.  When I first arrived in Italy, I had a utopian ideology about Italy, that it was the land of amazing and abundant healthy sustainable food.  Although Italy is not perfect, there are movements forming and initiatives that are combating the globalization of food.  This knowledge is what I am bringing back with me to the U.S.

My experience in Siena was amazing.  The Siena School of Liberal Arts and all the instructors were remarkable.  This is one experience that, although short, I could not have obtained by a simple vacation or some books.  It combined relevant history and readings that connected to the field trips as well as the immersion in Italian culture to produce an experience like nothing else.  There is no way I could have grasped the information presented without actually experiencing Italy.  The knowledge and experience gained in Siena will help me become a more influential advocate for change in the food systems, locally, regionally and globally.

Walkable Cities – Special Program Summer 2014

After co-teaching in the new Summer Sustainability Program last year with his colleague, Miguel Vasquez, Thomas Paradis, Professor and Chair Geography, Planning & Recreation at Northern Arizona University, became enthralled with the Palio and the contrada system even more so. He felt that Siena and its cohesive communities and active street life had a lot to teach his students about urban geography, public planning, and urban design. He decided to promote his own program, called Walkable, Safe Cities within our own Department of Geography, Planning & Recreation at NAU. Two faculty members decided to teach with him: Professors Mark Manone and Dawn Hawley. Mark is NAU local expert in GIS (Geographic Information Sciences) and geospatial mapping, and will teach the students GIS skills with several mapping projects in Siena. Dawn focuses on urban planning and walkability, and will teach students how to better design walkable, safe streets and other public places. Thomas Paradis will focus on the history of urban development and architecture in Italian cities, and the larger context of European and Italian demographics and political geography.

This year we have eight students joining us, all from the social science disciplines of geography, planning, psychology, sociology, and Criminal Justice. All students are expected to conduct research and write a blog page about a special topic of their choice related to Siena and the Tuscany region. The learning outcomes for the program are of utmost importance , which provide consistent, broad-level goals for the program and course. Our program is just as much about personal improvement, self-awareness, and confidence building as it is about course material and content.

The program has been built around the schedule of the Palio, allowing the students to witness one of the most engaging and community-focused events in Europe. Students have already prepared to better understand the palio-contrada system through an engaging book by Robert Rodi called “Seven Seasons in Siena,” followed by various additional, more academic readings. Thomas Paradis learned last year that the Seven Seasons book works very well to introduce Siena and the contrada system through the story of a rather bold American who attempts to integrate himself into the Bruco. That sets the stage for more academic readings about the contrada communities and the Palio itself. Later, the class will participate in a contrada tour of the Bruco by local tour guide, Dario Castagno, followed by a student mixer the next night with Bruco contrada youth. In this way the students can experience first-hand the places and people mentioned in Rodi’s book.
The program has started at the beginning of June and will last five weeks. So, stay tuned and visit our blog to discover students projects!

Walkable Cities – Special Program Summer 2014

After co-teaching in the new Summer Sustainability Program last year with his colleague, Miguel Vasquez, Thomas Paradis, Professor and Chair Geography, Planning & Recreation at Northern Arizona University, became enthralled with the Palio and the contrada system even more so. He felt that Siena and its cohesive communities and active street life had a lot to teach his students about urban geography, public planning, and urban design. He decided to promote his own program, called Walkable, Safe Cities within our own Department of Geography, Planning & Recreation at NAU. Two faculty members decided to teach with him: Professors Mark Manone and Dawn Hawley. Mark is NAU local expert in GIS (Geographic Information Sciences) and geospatial mapping, and will teach the students GIS skills with several mapping projects in Siena. Dawn focuses on urban planning and walkability, and will teach students how to better design walkable, safe streets and other public places. Thomas Paradis will focus on the history of urban development and architecture in Italian cities, and the larger context of European and Italian demographics and political geography.

This year we have eight students joining us, all from the social science disciplines of geography, planning, psychology, sociology, and Criminal Justice. All students are expected to conduct research and write a blog page about a special topic of their choice related to Siena and the Tuscany region. The learning outcomes for the program are of utmost importance , which provide consistent, broad-level goals for the program and course. Our program is just as much about personal improvement, self-awareness, and confidence building as it is about course material and content.

The program has been built around the schedule of the Palio, allowing the students to witness one of the most engaging and community-focused events in Europe. Students have already prepared to better understand the palio-contrada system through an engaging book by Robert Rodi called “Seven Seasons in Siena,” followed by various additional, more academic readings. Thomas Paradis learned last year that the Seven Seasons book works very well to introduce Siena and the contrada system through the story of a rather bold American who attempts to integrate himself into the Bruco. That sets the stage for more academic readings about the contrada communities and the Palio itself. Later, the class will participate in a contrada tour of the Bruco by local tour guide, Dario Castagno, followed by a student mixer the next night with Bruco contrada youth. In this way the students can experience first-hand the places and people mentioned in Rodi’s book.
The program has started at the beginning of June and will last five weeks. So, stay tuned and visit our blog to discover students projects!

A taste of the final photo projects for Jacqueline Tune’s class! TOMORROW Inside Reflections / Outside Perspectives, Saturday, May 10, 2014 from 4:30-7:30 PMJoin us for the chance to meet young artists from all over the world, hear creative writing readings, see photo displays and wander through open studios. Presentations of works begins at 5:00 PMat the Siena School for Liberal Arts.

A taste of the final photo projects for Jacqueline Tune’s class! 

TOMORROW 
Inside Reflections / Outside Perspectives, Saturday, May 10, 2014 from 4:30-7:30 PM

Join us for the chance to meet young artists from all over the world, hear creative writing readings, see photo displays and wander through open studios. 

Presentations of works begins at 5:00 PM
at the Siena School for Liberal Arts.

Student Perspective: Extended Family

(Communications Intern Adam DeSerio with his Italian host family) 

I simply can not believe it. We have done it. Study abroad in Italy is now something that we will forever carry with us, no matter where we go, and no matter what adventure we partake in next. But what made it so valuable, so life changing, so special? It was the connections and experiences we had with the families we lived with. All semester I have heard great stories, and funny ones, about the families that you all had, and wanted to make one of the last blogs about our host families. Here are a few of the stories:


(Danielle Bryant from NAU with her Italian host family) 
"When living with a family it’s messy and loud and far from perfect. That’s why this family was the perfect fit for me, and leaving them will be one of the hardest parts of going home. I can’t pin point a specific moment that I felt a part of the family, it’s just little moments here and there that make it. It’s when Carlo or Federico (my host brothers) say goodnight to me when they go to bed, or when Sabrina (my host mom) winks at me from across the table because we both get how crazy the boys can be, or when Elessio (my host dad) makes sure I try whatever wine he is having at dinner, those are a few of the times when I don’t feel like a student staying with them but a part of their family. Ask anyone though, all I do is brag about how lucky I got with these guys. They’re honestly the absolute greatest!"

-D.B.


 ((Melissa Vargas with her Italian host family) 

"My host family continuously shares the smiles, tears, fears, disappointments, and bursts of laughter that pertain to any individual of the household. Just today, I was trying to chase a bee out of my room and my host dad came in with a broomstick and a flashlight, providing comic relief and a good solution!"
-M.V. 


Of course, everyone knows about Emily’s funny shower story, about how the water stopped mid shower and the towel was the size of a napkin, and it’s these details which will last a lifetime in stories and memories in us all. We had the most amazing opportunity to not only life with another family than our own, but to actually become a part of another family. For us all, leaving behind our families here in Italy will not only be hard but also emotional. They have become such a part of our lives, as we for theirs. But know that we will forever have them in our hearts and our minds, for all of our lives.

(Andrea Dame with her Italian host mom)